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Fauci omits context, feeds alarm with warning of 100,000 coronavirus infections a day

Dr. Anthony Fauci testified before the Senate this week that the United States could soon see as many as 100,000 new coronavirus cases per day, feeding alarmist narratives that have spread rapidly through the media: Surging COVID-19 infections, hospital systems under strain, and the prospect of a "second wave" of the virus potentially throwing much of the nation back into open-ended lockdowns. 

Yet estimates cited by other U.S. public health authorities and academic researchers indicate we may have already far surpassed 100,000 new infections per day, the vast majority of them mild and/or asymptomatic. If so, the U.S. would now be significantly closer to herd immunity — and the end of the pandemic — than widely assumed. 

A representative of Fauci's office this week told Just the News that the public health expert's estimate this week was not "a hard prediction that we’d reach 100,000 cases per day"; rather, the doctor was indicating that "if we do not act quickly and decisively, the cases could surge to that level as a matter of exponential growth."

To be sure, cases in recent weeks have been surging in multiple states across the country, including Texas and Florida, with some local health systems under growing strain to handle the number of COVID-19-positive patients filling hospital beds. However, many of those states began reopening as long as two months ago, leaving experts scrambling to explain why surges would suddenly begin so long after reopening commenced.